The World’s Most Powerful Girl Is From Africa – Meet Zuriel Oduwole

Zuriel is a Chinese speaking native of Mauritius and Nigeria, born in Los Angeles and spends half her time between the US and Africa. In January of this year, Zuriel was called the World’s Most Powerful Girl, when she was honored by...

Zuriel is a Chinese speaking native of Mauritius and Nigeria, born in Los Angeles and spends half her time between the US and Africa. In January of this year, Zuriel was called the World’s Most Powerful Girl, when she was honored by the former US Secretary of StateJohn Kerry in his office in Washington DC. She was commended for her work on Girls Education across Africa, and her Film Making class which she started to teach new skills to young women in Africa.

In a New York Times ‘Women In The World‘ feature, the following was shared about the young amazon:

Zuriel speaking With Melinda Gates (Gates Foundation)

At just 15 years old, Zuriel Oduwole has met no fewer than 24 presidents and prime ministers as she carries out her mission to advocate for girls’ education in Africa. When talking to African leaders, the Los Angeles teenager stresses the need for “making policies so that girls are able to go to school until at least the age of 18 so they don’t get married when they are 12 or 13,” she explained to Agence-France Presse. Zuriel, born in the U.S. to parents of Nigerian and Mauritian origin, visited Paris last week where she was able to address thousands of young people at a solidarity concert, speaking about how poverty affects girls all across Africa.

Zuriel with Bill Gates talk youth empowerment in Paris

Ironically, Zuriel, who describes herself as “unstoppable,” has never attended school and instead has been home-schooled by her parents since the age of 3. At the tender age of 9 years old, Zuriel was able to interview former Ghanaian president Jerry Rawlings for a documentary, which ignited her career as a campaigner. “I saw a lot of children, especially girls, out on the streets selling things, and I see that a lot whenever I visit other African countries like Nigeria, Ethiopia and Tanzania.” Just last month, she was named one of Africa’s 100 most influential women by Forbes magazine, and next year she is planning on attending a prestigious university like Harvard or UCLA. But her ambitions reach way further than higher education.

Inspired by Africa’s first woman president, the Liberian leader Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Zuriel says she has her sights set on becoming president of the United States. Despite all this, Zuriel claims she can still find the time to be a normal teenager. “I play sports, I play football and basketball, I have friends I hang out with. I just happen to do all of these projects on the side.” See her in action and hear her talk in the video below.

Zuriel has been featured on several prominent and international magazines, Forbes [3 times] since the age of 10, ELLE, Vogue, New African Woman to name just a few. She has appeared live or scheduled on several global TV networks, including BBC, CNBC Power Lunch, CNN, TRT World, Bloomberg TV, and CCTV.

An Inspirational Journey To Young Girls & Women

Morning Devotion with Lagos – Nigeria School Kids

She has focused on showing herself as an example of what an educated girl can do and become, even from the age of 10, she wants to see a free society where the community or parents to girls are not forcing them into early married.

The future of women, especially women in Africa is indeed very bright, with young ladies like Zuriel leading and showing the world what can be achieved through collective action by all.

Watch Zuriel speaking to a large audience of young people at a festival in Paris. This report was shared by Ellen Racketien for ZurielOduwole.

Zuriel Oduwole Speaks with Nigerias President Buhari

Zuriel with Tuvalu Prime Minister

Zuriel with Samoa Prime Minister

Zuriel with President Hage Geingob of Namibia

Zuriel with Nobel Literature PRIZE Winner Prof. Wole Soyinka

Zuriel with Guyana President at the United Nations

– Report submitted by Elle Racketien
Categories
AdvocacyInspirationWomen in Africa
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