Alabama is producing a record number of black women candidates.

About three dozen African-American women are running for office as Democrats across deep-red Alabama; many say Democrat Doug Jones' unexpected Senate victory in December inspired them to take a chance as well as the wide-ranging impact of the #MeToo movement, Barack Obama's presidency and Trump's divisiveness and perceived animosity toward minorities.

Jameria Moore, a 49-year-old attorney, launched her campaign for a judgeship on the Jefferson County Probate Court. Ninety-eight percent of black women voted for Jones, according to an NBC News exit poll — a decisive factor in the former federal prosecutor becoming the first Democrat in 25 years to be elected to the Senate from Alabama. In three months, an unprecedented number of African-American women are taking the next step in building on that momentum by running for local and statewide office.

More than 35 black women have launched campaigns or re-election efforts, and more than three-quarters of them are running in Birmingham, in state and county judicial races, or for seats in the state legislature. Organizers and local officials say it’s evidence of a small but significant Democratic burst of political activism that could put a blue-hued dent in a deep-Trump state.

Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., a four-term congresswoman running for re-election this fall who was cited as a trailblazer by many of the black women now running for office, said it’s vital that women of all races be a part of the policy-making process “as the nation grapples with the realities of sexual harassment and assault.”

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